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Donald Trump Holds The Future of the Republican Party in his Hands

With the Trump presidency now in its final days and the Democan/Republicrat UniParty back in control of congress, talk will now inevitably turn to whether the Trump Army of 75 million voters will move to create a third party, effectively destroying the Republican Party in the process. Of course, we get this same sort of discussion anytime either party suffers a major defeat, and such efforts in the past have always failed.

But this time, things could be different for one simple fact that Tucker Carlson pointed to during his monologue on Thursday night’s show: The current leaders of the Republican Party just don’t like the vast majority of the party’s voter base, and Donald Trump does.

Here’s an excerpt from a story at The Daily Caller:

Fox News host Tucker Carlson said Thursday that the Republican Party leadership doesn’t “like their own voters.”

“And they especially don’t want the voters that Trump brought,” Carlson continued. “Trump brought the party’s ranks noticeably downscale, ‘from the country club to the trailer park,’ as they often sneer. And this horrifies them. Many Republicans in Washington now despise the people they’re supposed to represent and protect.”

Carlson claimed that “socially anxious white professionals” feel contempt for “working-class people who look like them.”

“So if you want to understand the hatred, the real hatred, not just disagreement but gut level loathing and fear of Trump — in say New York or Washington or L.A. — you’ve got to understand that first. It’s not really Trump; it’s his voters. The new money class despises them,” Carlson said.

[End]

I disagree somewhat with Carlson’s last statement there: The visceral hatred of the Trump movement in the major media centers of the country are about both Trump and his voters. The hatred and fear of that movement is only amplified by the reality that it’s really more than 75 million, given that it’s been pretty unarguably demonstrated that the true Trump vote was artificially depressed in every state where Dominion Systems technology is in use.

And let’s be honest, the hatred between the establishment Republicans and the vast majority of the GOP voter base is entirely mutual. Here is what happened at Reagan National Airport on Friday when Sen. Lindsey Graham, who used his chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee to avoid any real investigations into Obamagate and Spygate for the past two years, ran into a group of Trump supporters on Friday afternoon:

That’s an ugly scene, for sure. And remember, it’s a scene involving a politician whose Party’s ability to remain a national force depends on retaining the loyalty of those voters.

Seems like a pretty big lift, doesn’t it?

Meanwhile, the Republican National Committee re-elected Ronna Romney McDaniel, the niece of the head RINO himself, Mitt Romney, to be its leader for the coming four years:

To her credit, Ms. McDaniel worked hard to help President Trump achieve his re-election, often finding herself at odds with her Uncle Mitt in the process. At the same time, though, she has been the public face of a Party that has too often operated at odds with its own voter base.

Witness yesterday’s massive putsch against conservative users coordinated by leftist Big Tech monopolies like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google and Apple: The GOP had four years with a Republican president do to something, anything to exact some control over these corporate oligarchies, and did exactly nothing. As the purge was taking place Friday evening, not a single leader in the Republican Party had anything of any real note to say in opposition to it.

Now, after the predictably inept effort and bad outcome in the Georgia Senate runoff elections, the GOP has failed itself right back into the position it held in January of 2019: Not in control of a single lever of power in Washington, DC. As was clearly demonstrated over the past two months, that lack of control includes the U.S. Supreme Court despite Trump’s three appointments to that body.

I have never been in favor of blowing the whole thing up and starting over where the Republican Party is concerned. At similar junctures in the past, such as January 2009, it has always seemed to be that it would be more productive to work to reform the GOP from within. Given this current situation, and the near-universal disaffection of Trump voters from the GOP representatives they have sadly helped to elect, it is difficult to maintain that outlook any longer.

At best, the Republican Party has proven itself to be largely corrupt and hopelessly inept over the past four years. At worst, its elected representatives have demonstrated that, by and large, they have nothing but contempt for the people who elected them, as most recently demonstrated by their refusal to do anything to rein in the abuses of the Big Tech monopolies.

Donald Trump had 88 million followers to his now-banned Twitter account. Should he choose to do so, he has the ability to now lead much of this loyal base of support completely away from the Republican Party and establish a political party of his own. Given that Trump has no more use for the GOP’s elected officials than his supporters do, it seems unarguably true that the Republican Party’s continued existence as a national force in American politics stands on thinner ice than it ever has in the past.

It couldn’t happen to a more deserving bunch of people.

That is all.

Today’s news moves at a faster pace than ever before. Whatfinger.com is the only real conservative alternative to Drudge. It’s the tool I use to help keep up with all the day’s events, and it should be your tool, too.

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