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Change Election, or Status Quo? 2020 is Both.

Today’s Campaign Update, Part II (Because the Campaign Never Ends)

2020 is shaping up to be the most unique election cycle of modern times. – Regular readers will know of my contention that the quadrennial presidential election cycles always end up following one of two patterns, based on the overall dynamics at play within the national electorate.

If the general attitude among the population is one of satisfaction and complacency, then we end up having a status quo election, one that preserves the general balance of power in Washington, DC. If the general attitude among voters is one of dissatisfaction and unrest, we end up with a change election, one that shifts the balance of power from one party to the other.

By mid-2015, it had become obvious that the overriding attitude afoot across the nation was running in favor of a change election. By October of that year, it was obvious that Donald Trump would be the GOP nominee and that the DNC was going to fix its nominating process for the Pantsuit Princess. Given that the Coughing Crook was proudly running on the promise that her first term would basically be Barack Obama’s third term, it was obvious to me that Trump, the only candidate in the race promising significant change, would end up winning the general election.

2012 was a classic status quo election: Despite growing unrest with the radical leftist nature of the Obama regulatory regime, more Americans than not were in a mood to give him a shot at a second term, a reality bolstered by the fact that the Democrats were able to increase their Senate majority and cut into the GOP’s majority in the House that year. Mitt Romney’s ineptitude as a candidate certainly played a role, but the truth is that he never really had much chance of overcoming the overall voter inertia at play that year.

In large part due to the withering, unrelenting assault on President Trump by the Democrats and their corrupt toadies in the national news media, and due to Trump’s own unorthodox approach to his job, this year has become more difficult to read than it otherwise would be. Were traditional journalistic norms still in place in the media, an election featuring a president who has had so much success and who has kept pretty much every promise he made in his first election campaign would without any question at all end up as a status quo election, with his party having a strong shot at regaining the majority in the House.

But the undeniable success that the media has had in brainwashing a large segment of the public, along with the upheaval taking place within the Democrat Party and its nominating process, has created at least the perception of a potential change election coming.

So, which is it going to be? I think it’s going to be both: A change election within the confines of the Democrat Party and its nominating process, but a status quo election come November.

The most interesting aspect to watch over the next 8 months will be to see if the radical change happening within the Democrat Party will frighten the public to the extent that it decides to flip the House and return control of all levers of national power back to the GOP.

Newt Gingrich got it exactly right on Fox News last night when he said that Bernie Sanders is “the true Democratic Party.” Sanders winning in Iowa and New Hampshire and today in Nevada is not, contrary to what the leaders of the Party want us to believe, some fluke. Sanders keeps winning because the Democrat Party is now a majority socialist/Marxist party. Sanders is now the clear front-runner for the nomination because he is where the energy in the Democrat voter base happens to be.

He wasn’t quite there in 2016, but the tide of sentiment among Democrat voters has now reached the critical mass of endorsing outright socialism. Thus, the Party’s so-called “moderate” faction, who prefer socialist solutions dressed up in pretty costumes and gobs of lipstick, will be faced this July with the choice of either jumping on board the Commie train or finding another home. 2020 is the year that the Democrat Party’s inevitable inflection point arrives.

Feel the Bern. Feel the change.

Just as was the case with the Party’s takeover by George McGovern radicals in 1972, though, the radicals in the Democrat Party today are out of step with the vast majority of the electorate, and a Bernie Sanders candidacy will go down in flames not seen since Ronald Reagan’s destruction of Walter Mondale in 1984. A public that Gallup says is more satisfied with the status quo than it has been in decades is not going to put an outright communist into the White House.

So, come November, the status quo will pretty much inevitably prevail despite the change election taking place within the Democrat Party’s nominating process. Some will try to equate this to 2016, when Trump forced a similar shaking out to take place within the GOP, but that’s not correct. Remember, the change Trump represented was in step with the overall public desire for change that year. That election was change all the way, and the results proved it.

So, get ready for that rarest of rarities: A presidential election year in which a change election within the process of one party works to ensure a status quo general election outcome in favor of the other party.

Only in America.

That is all.

Today’s news moves at a faster pace than ever. Whatfinger.com is my go-to source for keeping up with all the latest events in real time.

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Is Bernie Sanders the Walter Mondale of George McGoverns?

Today’s Campaign Update
(Because The Campaign Never Ends)

It seems inevitable at this point, doesn’t it? – As the Democrats  lurch off to the far, far, far left of the political spectrum once again, we should take a moment to review some history of the Iowa Caucuses where that political Party is concerned.

Unlike in the Republican Party, where there has historically been little correlation between the Iowa winner as an indicator of who would become the ultimate nominee, this odd contest in this smallish state whose population is in no way indicative of the overall population of the United States tends to show us where the heart of the Democrat Party really lies. Indeed, in every election cycle during this century, and in 9 of the last 12 contests going back to 1972, Iowans have crowned the person who would eventually win the Democrat nomination.

This history tells us why the Democrat Party leaders are in such an obvious panic coming into today, with The Commie having moved into a significant polling lead in the Hawkeye state in recent weeks. It also helps to explain why, after 76 years of continuous existence, the DNC and poll co-sponsor CNN spiked the final Des Moines Register poll that has been traditionally issued on the day before the caucuses take place.

While there is precious little real ideological difference between Democrat so-called “moderates” and the Party’s outright communist faction, Party leaders and their corrupt toadies in the media know it is vitally important to maintain the fiction in the public’s mind. They fully understand that Bernie Sanders would have no better chance of defeating Donald Trump in November than would the reincarnation of Nikita Kruschev, and that having The Commie at the top of the ballot would mean the suffering of crushing losses in congressional and down-ballot races as well.

Crazy Bernie Still Loves the Commies - The Rush Limbaugh Show

This reality is why we saw on Sunday the reports that John Kerry, of all people, is so distressed at the reality of Joe Biden’s obvious incapability of holding the office that he is now actively considering trying to jump into the race to try to save the Party from Sanders. Kerry is an interesting case where Iowa is concerned, since 2004 was the last time that the Party’s communist faction thought it had a chance to dictate the nominee.

That was the year when leftist radical Howard Dean appeared to have all the momentum coming into Iowa, but was crushed by Kerry, ultimately finishing a weak 3rd place behind despicable John Edwards. Dean’s scream during his concession speech that night turned him into an immediate laughing stock and effectively ended his candidacy.

Neil deGrasse Tyson Turns Twitter Feed Into Live Show, Sciences The Sh*t Out Of Movies | Wonkette

Kerry went on to become the nominee, and run perhaps the most idiotic general election campaign in modern history. This is the guy who thinks he might be able to save the party from Sanders’ Stalinism.

One has to go all the way back to 1992 to find the last Iowa Caucus contest that did not choose the eventual Democrat nominee. That year was a bit of an aberration, since Iowa Senator Tom Harkin – himself a committed Marxist – won overwhelmingly in his home state against a field of other candidates who did not really bother to contest the caucuses, preferring to save their money and time for New Hampshire and other states down the road. No one in 1992 actually believed Harkin would become the nominee of the Party which ultimately chose Bill Clinton.

Iowa also missed in 1988 when Senator Dick Gephardt from neighboring Missouri won a close contest over Illinois Senator Paul Simon. Those mid-west Democrats like to stick together. Finishing a fairly strong third that year was this guy named Mike Dukakis, who happened to be the Governor of Massachusetts. Dukakis appeared to have a shot at defeating George H.W. Bush in the general election, until he agreed to a photo-op while riding in a tank:

Dukakis and the Tank - POLITICO Magazine

Things went steeply downhill from there.

Iowans also missed the boat the last time the Democrat Party actually nominated a real, true communist. That was in 1972, when South Dakota Senator George McGovern finished second to Maine Senator Edmund Muskie. The fake news media of the time did everything in its power to prop a poorly-organized Muskie up in that race, but the Party was radicalizing at that time, with the hippie generation taking a dominant role in its primary races. McGovern ultimately became the nominee and went onto lose what was at the time a historic landslide to incumbent President Richard Nixon. With campaign swag like this, it isn’t hard to see why:

Lot Detail - “George McGovern For President” 1.75” 1968 Hopeful Picture Button

McGovern’s landslide loss was surpassed 12 years later by Walter Mondale, who was running against another strong GOP incumbent, Ronald Reagan. Mondale wasn’t an outright communist, but he still managed to win only his home state of Minnesota and the District of Columbia after promising that he would raise everyone’s taxes as his first act in office. Not smart.

The Reagan campaign slogan that year looked sort of familiar:

Elections from 1968 to 2012 | Virginia Museum of History & Culture

All of this is a long way around to saying that, at least where the Democrats are concerned, the Iowa Caucuses are historically serious business, and that history tells us that there is a high probability that tonight’s ultimate winner will end up becoming the Party’s presidential nominee.

So, will Bernie Sanders become the Walter Mondale of George McGoverns? Stay tuned.

That is all.

 

Today’s news moves at a faster pace than ever. Whatfinger.com is my go-to source for keeping up with all the latest events in real time.

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