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The Oil And Gas Situation: A Time For Setting Records

They say numbers don’t lie, and the last two weeks for the U.S. oil and gas industry have seen the announcements of some pretty amazing numbers. These are numbers that demonstrate exactly how productive and efficient the business has become, and numbers that must be put into some context to understand how extraordinary they really are.

So, as we move into mid-December 2018, let’s give it a shot:

The U.S became a “net exporter” of petroleum liquids for the first time 75 years. – That’s right, the week of November 30 through December 5 saw the United States of America actually export more crude oil and other oil-derived liquids than it imported from other countries. The key part of that sentence is “other oil-derived liquids,” which include gasoline, diesel and other refined products. Rolling all of those products into the equation, the U.S. exported about 211,000 barrels per day more than it imported for the week, as reported by Bloomberg.

The U.S. did not become a net exporter of “crude oil,” as some others in the energy news media mistakenly reported. As Robert Rapier reported at Forbes.com over the weekend, our country is still a sizable net importer of crude alone, an equation that will not be reversed anytime soon.

Regardless, the fact that the U.S. had higher volumes of oil-derived liquids moving out of its various ports than it had coming for a full week is an extraordinary change of circumstance from just a decade ago, a true sea change delivered by the ability to extract oil from the nation’s shale formations.

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USGS Haynesville/Bossier Resource Estimate Decimates The Notion Of “Peak Gas”

Hey, guess what?  There’s a bunch of natural gas out there along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast!

That’s what the US Geological Survey (USGS) announced on April 13, with its assessment that the combined Haynesville and Bossier shales, sandstones and carbonates contain a gigantic volume of natural gas, which the USGS estimates at a total of 304 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in place.  That represents enough natural gas to supply country’s entire demand for natural gas for about 12 years, just from two formations, and it represents a 330% increase over the agency’s 2010 resource estimate.

As USGS noted, the formations also contain a very large volume of oil and natural gas liquids:

The Bossier and Haynesville Formations of the onshore and State waters portion of the U.S. Gulf Coast contain estimated means of 4.0 billion barrels of oil, 304.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to updated assessments by the U.S. Geological Survey. These estimates, the largest continuous natural gas assessment USGS has yet conducted, include petroleum in both conventional and continuous accumulations, and consist of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

The updated estimate is a part of an ongoing USGS program to re-visit many of the largest oil and gas producing basins in the country, in order to create a more accurate picture of the resource available for the nation’s use as we move into the future.  The agency previously released an updated estimate of oil contained in the Wolfcamp formation in the Permian Basin, which I analyzed last November.  This is an important exercise designed to better inform public policy decisions related to energy, especially given the amount of ridiculous mis-information that gets into the media every day, such as the always-present but never correct “peak oil” and “peak gas” theories.

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