STEER: A New Kind of Trade Association

A Sleeping Giant Beneath The Chalk

Nestled in a quiet area of suburban Dallas, just off the intersection of Texas State Highway 12 and Interstate 30, lies the neighborhood of Eagle Ford. At one time an incorporated city, Eagle Ford was annexed in the mid-1950s by the city of Dallas, whose city center skyscrapers can be seen just 6 miles away.

Originally settled by the family of Enoch Horton in 1844, the community soon became known as an important crossing of the West Fork of the Trinity River. The Horton family established a grist mill; and within a few years they donated land to establish the town’s first cemetery and for the right of way and depot for the Texas and Pacific Railway. As was the case for hundreds of communities in Texas’ early decades, the establishment of a rail depot led quickly to rapid population growth. By the 1870s, Eagle Ford had become a key shipping point for the cattle industry, and its population had grown to several thousand.

The death of the trail drives led to the collapse of the cattle business, and by the 1890s, Eagle Ford’s population hovered around 50 citizens, where it remained well into the mid-20th century. Memory of the community’s heyday was largely lost to history, where it remained until late 2008.

Not far from the location of the original Horton grist mill, a small cliff face reveals an out-cropping of the Austin Chalk formation, which had become famous during the 1970s and again in the 1990s for the production of prodigious amounts of crude oil. Indeed, the Chalk is experiencing a bit of a third revival today.

Immediately beneath the Chalk outcropping, another formation displays what seems to be a rocky, clay-like profile. This formation is actually a shale formation, one that happens to be the source rock for the Austin Chalk. It was the oil migrating up from the Eagle Ford that made the Chalk such a prodigious formation to begin with.

Like the Austin Chalk, the Eagle Ford Shale extends deep into South Texas and even under the Rio Grande into northern Mexico. Unlike the Chalk, however, this formation had received scant attention until October 2008, when Petrohawk (now a part of BHP Billiton) drilled what is credited as the first commercial horizontal well completed in the formation in La Salle County. The well, completed with a 3,200-foot horizontal lateral involving a 10-stage frac job, produced at an initial flow rate of about 7,600 MMBTU of natural gas per day, and the race was on.

 

Read The Rest Here

Open post

Capital Flow To The Permian Basin Hasn’t Dried Up; It Has Moved Downstream

headline in Tuesday’s online edition of The Houston Chronicle, “Drillers Choke Off Dollars To Permian Basin Operations,” may have unintentionally caused confusion regarding the current state of play in the country’s most active drilling and oil-producing basin.

The story to which this headline was attached references a report by the firm Wood MacKenzie that discusses how upstream merger-and-acquisition activity in the Permian has trailed off somewhat dramatically in recent months. This is entirely true. As The Chronicle points out, Wood MacKenzie’s data indicates: “Drillers spent $35 billion in West Texas over a nine-month period that ended in early spring. By comparison, the collective value of land deals of the last six months is less than $5 billion.”

Someone at The Chronicle apparently realized that the initial headline was somewhat confusing ― the Wood McKenzie report does not talk about any slowdown in drilling ― because the headline was later changed to read “Rising Costs, Land Prices Have ‘Taken The Edge Off’ Permian Basin.” It was inevitable that the upstream M&A fever that developed in the Permian last summer was bound to eventually slow down. As geographically huge as the Basin is, there is a limit to the amount of acreage within it that could rationally be evaluated to meet acquisition costs that in some deals exceeded $40,000 per acre. So it is not surprising at all that the pace of land and reserves transactions has slowed dramatically.

Read The Rest Here

Open post

The Wisdom And Foresight Of The Texas Rainy Day Fund

In its infinite wisdom (OK, I’m kidding just a little here), the Texas Legislature showed great foresight during its 1981 session, creating what the state calls the Texas Economic Stabilization Fund but what has since come to be commonly known as the Rainy Day Fund. At the time, policymakers took advantage of a great boom time in the petroleum industry, using the state’s oil and gas severance tax receipts as the funding source for virtually the entire fund balance.

Over the last 36 years, the Rainy Day Fund has proved to be exactly what it was billed to be back in 1981: a fund that has had the effect of stabilizing the state’s budget situation. As an example, the Great Recession created huge revenue shortfalls for the state government going into both the 2009 and 2011 legislative sessions, forcing policymakers to cut spending on state services deeply. But the ability to take billions of dollars from the Rainy Day Fund ensured that cuts to the bone did not become cuts into the marrow of those services.

The Rainy Day Fund has also allowed legislators to address other pressing state issues without impacting the budget’s General Fund. The 2013 session of the legislature funded the state’s entire $50 billion State Water Plan by tapping the Rainy Day Fund for $2 billion, establishing a revolving line of credit that will be used to finance a large variety of dams and other water projects in the coming decades. That same session also, with the approval of the state’s voters, tapped the Rainy Day Fund for $2.25 billion to fund much-needed road improvement projects all over Texas.

Even after all those and other large, special withdrawals over the last decade, the Rainy Day Fund today retains a balance of over $10 billion, money that is available to help Houston and other areas of Southeast Texas rebuild from Hurricane Harvey. In short, the Texas Rainy Day Fund is a pretty phenomenal success story for which the oil and gas industry rarely receives much credit.

Read The Rest Here

Open post

In Light Of Constant Waivers, Is It Time To Repeal The Jones Act?

I’ve written entirely too much about the Jones Act this year, but like a bad penny, it just keeps turning up in the public discourse.  Last time I addressed this subject, it was over an effort by the U.S. shipping industry actually expand this pernicious and archaic protectionist law, an effort that thankfully failed thanks to some last minute interventions by a few members of the Texas congressional delegation.

That was back in May.  Now, here we are four months later and the Jones Act has once again become the subject of national media coverage, this time mainly because President Trump keeps having to suspend it in order to help save lives after major hurricane events have devastated the U.S. and its territories.  That sentence alone should make any observer wonder:  After all, if a law has to be suspended during times of crisis to help save lives, shouldn’t we at some point consider whether the law should exist at all?

Before we get into that, let’s review what the Jones Act actually does.  Fellow Forbes contributor Ted Loch-Temziledes, in an excellent piece on the Act, sums it up thusly:

The act regulates all maritime commerce in U.S. waters and between U.S. ports. It requires that shipping of all goods transported between U.S. ports be carried out by ships under the U.S flag. The ships must be constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents. Furthermore, the steel used in any foreign repair work on a Jones Act vessel must be less than ten percent of the ship’s total weight. Waivers are only possible on a temporary basis, in cases involving national defense, or other emergencies, such as hurricanes.

Read the Rest Here

Open post

It’s Been A Tough Week For Peak Oil Theorists

In news that is certain to upset adherents to the never-dying cult of Peak Oil, IHS Markit released a study on Sept. 25 indicating that, per their analysis of data from more than 440,000 oil wells in the Permian Basin, the basin still has somewhere between 60 and 70 billion barrels of producible oil to give up in coming years. That’s not exactly the “near-infinite resource” view of the Permian held by Allen Gilmer and his staff at DrillingInfo, but it certainly supports the notion that the basin will remain a very active area for oil and gas development for decades to come.

“The Permian Basin is America’s super basin in terms of its oil and gas production history, and for operators, it presents a significant variety of stacked targets that are profitable at today’s oil prices,” Prithiraj Chungkham, director of unconventional resources for IHS, said in the statement.

The IHS Markit study is the latest in a string of resource estimates in the past year that have produced a growing understanding of the true magnitude of the resource in place in the Permian. Last November, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issued its own resource estimate that a single formation in the Permian, the Wolfcamp Shale, contains 20 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil, by far the largest such estimate ever issued for any single formation by the USGS. Most in the industry understand that this is actually a conservative resource estimate because USGS limits its resource assessments to reserves that are producible using current technology. Given that technology advances in the oil and gas industry every day, such estimates, while useful markers, are out of date before they are even released.

 

Read the Rest Here

Open post

Energy Transfer Takes Eco-Terrorism Allegations To Court

Just a few days ago, I wrote a piece commenting on the rarity of an oil and gas operator ― in this case Cabot Oil & Gas ― aggressively pursuing litigation in court instead of taking the path of least resistance. Imagine my surprise ― maybe even delight ― when, just hours after that piece was published, I read the news that Energy Transfer Partners, the builder of the Dakota Access Pipeline, had filed suit in Federal District Court against Greenpeace, EarthFirst and others who organized and participated in the long protest action and subsequent efforts to damage that pipeline.

The complaint, according to the company’s press release, “alleges that this group of co-conspirators (the ‘Enterprise’) manufactured and disseminated materially false and misleading information about Energy Transfer and the Dakota Access Pipeline (‘DAPL’) for the purpose of fraudulently inducing donations, interfering with pipeline construction activities and damaging Energy Transfer’s critical business and financial relationships. The complaint also alleges that the Enterprise incited, funded and facilitated crimes and acts of terrorism to further these objectives. It further alleges claims that these actions violated federal and state racketeering statutes, defamation, and constituted defamation and tortious interference under North Dakota law.”

Robert Duval’s character in “True Grit” might look at that paragraph and call it “bold talk for a one-eyed fat man,” and no doubt proving these claims against well-financed conflict groups like Greenpeace and EarthFirst, which we can be sure will be very effective represented in court, will present a high bar. But we can also be sure that no corporation would pursue such controversial litigation unless its management and legal teams believed there was a strong opportunity for success. The real monetary costs and potential for reputational damage are too high to risk on a case with a low prospect for success.

Read The Rest Here

Open post

Gilmer: We Should View The Permian Basin As A Permanent Resource

Allen Gilmer, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman at DrillingInfo, Inc., is not a man who minces words, an attribute that has served him well during a long career in the oil and gas industry.  When it comes to the Permian Basin and the amount of oil and gas resource contained in it, he becomes positively loquacious.

“We should view the Permian Basin as a permanent resource,” he says, “The Permian is best viewed as a near infinite resource – we will never produce the last drop of economic oil from the Basin.”

No one disputes that the resource in the Permian is huge, but ‘infinite’ is a big word.  I asked him to expand on that concept.  “That is the practical reality with the amount of resource that is in the ground,” he says, “The research we’ve done indicates that we have at least half a trillion barrels in the Permian at reasonable economics, and it could be as high as 2 trillion barrels.  That is, as a practical matter, an infinite amount of resource, and it is something that has huge geopolitical consequence for the United States, in a very good way.  It has a huge consequence in terms of GDP, and right now it is creating an American energy global ascendancy.”

 

Read The Rest Here

Open post

Do Fossil Fuel Protesters Know How Much Those Fuels Impact Their Lives?

Last Friday, the American Statesman published a piece titled “About 100 Protesters Call For Austin To End Fossil Fuel Use For Power”. Being from Texas, I read the piece and viewed the video attached to the story with great interest. The City of Austin – Texas’s capital city – maintains its own power utility that is separate from the power grid that provides electricity to most of the rest of the state.

The protesters were on-hand to oppose a proposed plan that would increase the city’s use of renewable fuel to 65% by 2027. In a state rich in natural gas resources for power generation, this goal wasn’t aggressive enough for these 100 souls.

My first thought upon seeing the group of protesters was to wonder how many of them drove to the site of the protest in gasoline-powered cars, which make up about 99% of automobile fleet in Texas?  I wondered further if any of them understand that many of the components in the cars they drive – even Teslas – are made from petroleum-derived products?

Many in the group were wearing sneakers. I can’t help wondering if they know that those shoes are in part made from petroleum products? Some carried backpacks – do they know that parts of many such items are to some extent made from petroleum products?

It was a prosperous-looking bunch, most of whom no doubt practice sound dental hygiene. I couldn’t help wondering if they know there’s a very good chance their toothpaste – and their toothbrush, for that matter – is largely derived from petroleum? I wonder if the women among the group realize that their makeup and lipsticks are most likely derived from petroleum as well?

Read The Rest Here

Open post

Everyone Chill Out, OK?

Just a little perspective on the current situation, and then I’ll shut up for the day:
 
  • The current effort by the fake media/Democrat Party ministry of disinformation to tar President Trump as a racist and run him out of office is just a repeat of the playbook they used against Ronald Reagan in 1981-84. Same tactics, same false claims, same inflammatory protests and rhetoric. We have, in other words, seen this movie before.
  • We should all remember that the ending to that movie in 1984 was the single greatest landslide re-election of any sitting president in the history of the American Republic. The average American is much more perceptive than Democrats believe they are.
  • We also need to remember this key difference between 1984 and today – The Democrat Party’s status has radically changed:

    • The Democrat Party in 1984 was a majority national party in almost every respect outside of the Oval Office.  It controlled both houses of congress, a majority of state governorships and a majority of state legislative houses.  It was the majority party in the West, the majority party in the Rust Belt, the majority party in the Midwest, and the majority party in the Northeast.  It had real leadership in congress, and a strong bench of younger, upcoming leaders.  What it didn’t have was a strong candidate to challenge Reagan, whose popularity boomed along with the national economy, which had come roaring back in response to his program of tax cuts.
    • By contrast, The Democrat Party today is in complete and utter disarray. It has no leadership that is attractive outside one fringe group or another.  It is now nothing more than a regional party comprised of an often-conflicting collection of single-issue grievance constituencies.  Its only unifying core philosophy is one of hate:  Hate Trump, hatred of white men, hatred of the police, hatred of the military, hatred of fossil fuels and pipelines.  It has no real leadership outside of the evil George Soros and the termed-out Barack Obama and the twice-failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.  It has no bench of young, upcoming stars to replace its current sclerotic leaders.  It is the majority party only on the West Coast and in some of the Northeast.  It controls neither house of congress, only 4 of 9 seats on the Supreme Court, only 15 of 50 governorships, and an even smaller number of state legislatures.  It is an utterly corrupt and dying entity.
    • Even better for the Republicans, the termed-out Barack Obama, whose feckless and corrupt rule from the radical left and deployment of Alinskyite tactics against his political enemies led directly to the fall of the Democrat Party, is promising to move back onto the political stage this fall.  This can only work to the GOP’s advantage.
  • So tonight, when you turn on CNN or MSNBC (for what reasons I can’t even fathom at this point other than self-abuse)  and see a panel made up of 4 squealing liberals, 2 pontificating fake Republican Trump-haters, and a token real Republican who is there for “balance”, realize that fewer than 1 out of 3000 other Americans are joining you in that inexplicable activity.  Most of them are hopelessly lost souls, but they do not a majority make.
  • Meanwhile, the U.S. economy continues to heat up; the FBI and Justice Department appear to be turning back into real, functioning law enforcement entities again; U.S. foreign policy is working again, even at the previously worthless United Nations; the swamp creatures who have infested and corrupted the State Department, the IRS, the Interior Department, the Energy Department, the EPA and the Department of (no) Education are being run off in droves; the rapidly rising production and exports of oil, coal and liquefied natural gas are turning the U.S. into an energy powerhouse on the international stage; and there have been more than 1 million new jobs created in our country during the first half of 2017.
  • As we sit here today, all of these factors and many more mean it is very likely, given good health, that Donald Trump will be a two-term president.  So do what I’m going to do this evening:  stop worrying and be happy.

That is all.

 

Posts navigation

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Scroll to top