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EnergyWeek, Episode 7: Covering the Oil And Gas Landscape With Allen Gilmer

Energy Week, Episode 7:  Covering the Oil and Gas Landscape With Allen Gilmer

David and Ryan were happy to welcome DrillingInfo Chairman Allen Gilmer to the show.  The show begins with a discussion about DrillingInfo’s recent acquisitions and the services it provides to a wide variety of clients.  The discussion then moved to a recently-released study from MIT which theorizes that the U.S. Energy Information Agency is over-estimating the potential for oil and gas recovery in U.S. shale plays, a thesis with which Allen strongly disagrees.  Next, Ryan and David asked Allen about his views about the Eagle Ford Shale and its potential, before moving to a similar discussion about the Permian Basin.  The show closes with Allen giving listeners his views on the outlook for natural gas this winter and in the coming years.

 

Links to Articles Referenced in this Episode:

MIT Study Suggests U.S. Vastly Overstates Oil Output Forecasts

After 2.5 Billion Barrels, Eagle Ford Has More Oil Coming

Gilmer: We Should View The Permian Basin As A Permanent Resource

 

Listen to the Podcast Here

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Goldman Is Right: The Oil Market Is Overly Jittery

Bloomberg carried a report late last week titled “Goldman Says Oil Market’s Too Jittery When There’s No Need to Be.” The report summarized a memo from Goldman Sachs analysts positing that the just-completed extension of the deal between OPEC and Russia to limit oil exports “indicates a reduced risk of both unexpected increases in supply as well as excess draws in stockpiles.”

The report didn’t address the reality that one of the main reasons why the crude markets remain jittery is very likely due to all the conflicting reporting in the energy-related news media leading up to that extension. While there was never any real, firm reason to doubt the extension would get done, pretty much every day in November was filled with speculative stories with click-bait headlines expressing doubts the parties could reach agreement.

While this is just the nature of the U.S. news media in general these days, the reality is that there has been precious little volatility in crude prices throughout the second half of 2017. In fact, on June 19, I wrote the following:

The mid-year review processes [for corporate upstream companies] I mention there are now coming to conclusions, and as a result of those reviews, we can expect the domestic rig count to level off and even perhaps decline slightly over the second half of 2017.

That’s exactly what has happened as these large independent producers scaled back their drilling budgets for the second half of this year, and it’s the main reason the frequent ups and downs in crude prices that had characterized the previous two-plus years have been replaced by what has been a steady rise in prices over the last five months. The key understanding to grasp in this equation is that, once OPEC and Russia agreed to artificially limit their exports, U.S. shale producers then become the de facto swing producer on the global stage.

 

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Energy Week: Episode 6 – Oil Markets and Renewable Fantasies

In this episode, David and Ryan why the oil market seems overly jittery now that it appears the market is back in balance after three years of chronic over-supply.  They also discuss how super tankers co-loaded with crude from both the U.S. and Mexico have helped open up Asian markets to U.S. producers, why solar really isn’t cheaper than coal despite all the hype in the media, and celebrate the fact that Shell has now restored its full cash dividend thanks to its strengthening bottom line.

Listen to the Podcast Here

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Energy Week With David Blackmon And Ryan Ray: Episode 5

Episode 5 – Debating energy-related issues based on facts and reality rather than hyperbole

Show Notes:  In this episode David and Ryan discussed the pending deal between Russia and OPEC to extend their export limitation agreement through the end of 2018, and how crucial that deal is for the direction of crude oil prices on the global market.  Also discussed:  natural gas production in the Permian Basin; what’s next for the Keystone XL Pipeline; the ongoing revival of Alaska’s oil and gas industry; and why renewables won’t be crowding fossil fuels out of the energy markets anytime soon.

 

Listen to the Podcast here

 

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Energy Week Podcast, Episode 4: Why the majors aren’t worried about “Peak Oil”

Energy Week, Episode 4:  Why the majors aren’t worried about “Peak Oil” but the markets are worried about events in Saudi Arabia.

Show Notes:  In this episode, David Blackmon and Ryan Ray discussed how the ongoing upheaval in Saudi Arabia is impacting oil markets, and the impacts it all could have on the planned IPO for Saudi Aramco.  Next, they talked about the reasons why the various “Peak Oil” theories and narratives are wrong, and why the big oil companies aren’t really worried about them.  Finally, David talked about the reasons why he thinks the U.S. industry just might not mess up the current positive oil price situation in 2018.

 

Listen to the Podcast Here

 

Links to articles referenced in Episode 4 of Energy Week:

Power grab in Saudi Arabia threatens oil market stability

 “End Of Oil” Narratives Are Misleading

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Oil Pulls Back After U.S. Rig Count Sees Significant Increase

Why U.S. Oil Producers Might Not Mess Up A Good Thing In 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why U.S. Oil Producers Might Not Mess Up A Good Thing In 2018

A good friend of mine who runs the government affairs shop at a large independent producer has a favorite saying: You can always count on the oil and gas industry to mess up a good thing. The last time he said that to me was about this time a year ago, when it was apparent that, after a terrible year during which the oil price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) had sunk as low as $26/bbl, the price would top $50 by the end of the year in the wake of the agreement between OPEC, Russia and several other non-OPEC nations to curtail exports.

We were discussing the probability that, in response to that higher commodity price, the upstream segment of the industry would respond by activating a large number of idled drilling rigs early in 2017 and drill its way right back down to a lower price. Which, of course, is exactly what happened: The industry brought more than 200 additional rigs online during January and February, and another 100 or so during the next couple of months, and the market responded by trading for WTI at $43/bbl by the end of April, even as OPEC and Russia reported high levels of compliance with their lower production quotas.

Now here we are, coming toward the end of another year, and once again we have a situation in which crude prices are ramping up to an even higher level, thanks to steadily rising demand, anticipation that OPEC and Russia will renew their export agreement through 2018, and other favorable market signals. One of those other favorable signals is the fact that the rig count in the U.S. has fallen off by about 70 rigs in the last seven weeks, as shale producers have executed on more conservative drilling budgets during the second half of the year. As a result, the rate of increase in overall domestic oil production has basically leveled off at levels the market can absorb.

So will the U.S. industry mess up a good thing again in 2018? It might surprise my good friend that this time I don’t think it will, at least not to the extent that it did over the first half of 2017. This view could change by the end of December, but right now there are several factors that indicate that, while drilling will definitely pick up again after January 1, it will be a more muted response than we saw this year.

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GOP Proposes Tax Plan That U.S. Shale Will Love And Tesla Will Hate

The popular joke about Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk is that every time his company reports another quarterly operational loss, he makes another high-profile speech about creating a human colony on Mars. After last week, Musk may need to consider making a series of such speeches.

Not only did Tesla report another quarterly loss last week, it reported its biggest single-quarter loss since starting business in 2009. Its Q3 2017 loss of $619 million almost doubled its previous record quarterly loss, which came in Q2 2017. That second-quarter loss barely exceeded the company’s Q1 loss of $330 million.  2017 has not been kind to Tesla.

As if to heap insult onto injury, just a couple of days after Musk had to acknowledge his company’s worst financial quarter, the Republican-dominated House of Representatives unveiled its proposed tax overhaul for both individual and corporate taxpayers. While the GOP plan would lower the corporate tax rate on corporate profits to 20%, from its current 35%, that is hardly relevant to Tesla, which has never reported an annual profit in its history and in fact has only twice reported a quarterly profit.

Making matters even worse, not just for Tesla but for all other manufacturers of electric vehicles in the U.S., the GOP tax plan would repeal the existing $7,500 tax credit available to purchasers of these cars. This credit, along with similar credit and rebate programs available in the various states, has enabled EVs to be at least somewhat price competitive with gasoline and diesel cars. Were the credit to go away, it is very likely that sales of EVs would plummet, a reality that no amount of speeches or press releases about Mars could hope to offset.

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Energy Week With David Blackmon and Ryan Ray Podcast – Episode 2

In Episode 2 of Energy Week, David Blackmon and Ryan Ray discuss current dynamics with the domestic rig counts and prices, and the implications they pose for the rest of this year and into 2018.  Other topics of discussion include:

  • Why electric vehicles still aren’t making a dent in U.S. demand for gasoline-powered cars;
  • The heinous abuse of the court system by a professional protester who caused a riot a year ago at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline; and
  • Blackmon’s Forbes article advocating for an increase in the federal gasoline tax.

Listen Here

 

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STEER: A Business Model That Works

It was great to be able to write this issue’s cover feature on the South Texas Energy & Economic Roundtable (STEER) and its outstanding staff, including President and CEO Omar Garcia. Watching the organization have so much success has been very rewarding, since I played a minor role in its creation back in 2012; and writing the piece provided a chance to reflect on the STEER business model and why the oil and gas industry should try to replicate it in other parts of the country.

By late 2011, it had become obvious to everyone that the Eagle Ford Shale was a world-class resource that represented an unprecedented opportunity for economic development in South Texas. Shortly after a lunch during which I and a group of colleagues talked about how best to go about protecting this opportunity, I got on a conference call with the Haynesville Shale Operators’ Committee (HSOC). This coincidence of timing was what spurred my involvement in the germination of STEER.

HSOC was the brainchild of the Louisiana Oil & Gas Association (LOGA) and its President, Don Briggs. Created during the height of the development of the Haynesville Shale natural gas development, the organization served as an extremely effective voice for the industry in what was at the time the busiest shale development region of the country. The challenge the Haynesville Shale presented to LOGA was its concentration in the northwest corner of the state, hundreds of miles from the state capital of Baton Rouge, where LOGA’s offices were located.

Rather than have its staff constantly travel back and forth between Baton Rouge and Shreveport to help its members address community and regulatory issues, LOGA came up with the model of establishing a committee within its organizational structure that essentially functioned as a separate trade association. To become members of HSOC, companies paid separate dues, and the committee itself had its own separate staff.

To further distinguish HSOC as a separate entity, the HSOC staff seldom became engaged in the single most crucial role of any state trade association — lobbying the state’s legislature. Instead, HSOC focused on helping members with community and media relations, functions that have not traditionally been strong points for the industry’s legacy associations.

The model worked. HSOC was a tremendous asset for producers, the media and communities in the region, all of whom needed an honest-broker intermediary to help understand and communicate with one another.

Seeing no reason why this model wouldn’t work just as well in South Texas — where the sudden, massive growth in oil and gas activity was very predictably creating lots of friction and challenges in the local communities — I took the idea to Rob Looney, then-President of the Texas Oil & Gas Association (TXOGA), one of the industry’s largest trade associations, headquartered in Austin. My involvement ended there, since I had a conflicting role with one of the industry’s national trade associations at that time.

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